Off the beaten track by Adam Georgelin – Beginners to Winners – July 2016 – Volume 1, Issue 1

Off the beaten track by Adam Georgelin

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Birds refreshing before liberation

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Transporter after liberation

In my short time involved in this sport as a solo flier it has come to my attention how lucky I am to know the people involved in the sport that I do. I have obtained a family of birds that has stood the test of time for some of the VHA and VRPU’s best fliers, I have gained knowledge, I have been involved in fantastic club environments, made some fantastic friends and best of all in recent times I have travelled.
You see although I am a member of the VRPU which is a larger organisation As I mentioned before unlike the larger organisation’s who often have a large truck specialised for transporting the birds to the release points which usually enables the birds to be fed and watered on route before the mass release, the smaller combines and federations coordinate the races on a much smaller but equally professional manner. Over the trip the convoy leader must stop a number of times, unload the birds in a safe location, feed and water the birds, reload and continue on the journey ready for the release. At a predetermined time after the birds are again refreshed the birds are set free from the transporter for their flight back to the various home lofts. Larger organisations have been known to release many thousands of pigeons competing in races each weekend during the winter months.
As I mentioned before unlike the larger organisation’s who often have a large truck specialised for transporting the birds to the release points which usually enables the birds to be fed and watered on route before the mass release, the smaller combines and federations coordinate the races on a much smaller but equally professional manner. Over the trip the convoy leader must stop a number of times, unload the birds in a safe location, feed and water the birds, reload and continue on the journey ready for the release. At a predetermined time after the birds are again refreshed the birds are set free from the transporter for their flight back to the various home lofts. Larger organisations have been known to release many thousands of pigeons competing in races each weekend during the winter months. But the smaller combines could have as few as 50 birds released week to week. Traveling to the release point you have no choice but to take in the scenery and it leaves you mesmerized as to how your little bird winds up back at your loft hundreds or even thousands of kilometers away from where they were released.

Some of the release points I have encountered are so baron with vast areas of little more than spindle weed and red dry dusty red soil you would never think anything will pass over the landscape. Add in to the mix predators and to be perfectly honest it is amazing that any birds cross the country side let alone the large numbers of returns we see each week.

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